Session 5 – Experiences from the science-policy interface in the Arctic

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In the Arctic, the ambition towards reaching the UN sustainable development goals is high on the political agenda, in parallel with the objective for both blue and green growth. However, sustainable development is complex and multifaceted, and requires considerations of synergies and trade-offs when balancing growth, economy, development and socio-ecological sustainability. This requires joint efforts from decision-makers, researchers and scientists, business, industry, indigenous peoples and local communities alike. Hence, successfully navigating sustainable development in the Arctic will require the integration of scientific, local and indigenous knowledge, stakeholder perspectives and approaches for understanding social well-being, to inform management and decision-making processes. We herewith understand the science-policy interface as the integration of scientific, local, and indigenous knowledge into decision-making processes through ways of effectively engaging with multiple actors and decision-makers, and thereby achieving demonstrable impacts on policy and practice.

This session aims to shed light on approaches that can support sustainable development through the collection and combination of various types of knowledge, methods to assess socio-ecological well-being, approaches to knowledge co-production and co-management, to contribute to inclusive, and well-informed decision-making.

To gain insights into the diverse pathways and approaches for co-created and evidence-based decision-making in support of sustainable development in the Arctic, we are looking for contributions on, including, but not limited to:

  • Experiences and pathways towards policy-informed science and science-informed policy in the Arctic, from theory to practice, and from local to international level.
  • Approaches and methods for decision-relevant knowledge co-production in the Arctic, including local and indigenous knowledge systems and participatory approaches, and monitoring and assessment tools and approaches to inform management and policy.
  • The role of business and industry in shaping sustainable development and decision-making in the Arctic.
  • Legal barriers and solutions to science-informed policy and knowledge-based decision-making processes.
  • Science diplomacy.
  • The role of formal and informal training and education (e.g. through universities, communities of practice, international projects and international cooperation tools,  etc.) to bridge the science-policy gap.
  • Ways to communicate decision-relevant knowledge.

The session committee considers publishing a special issue or collection of articles in a high-impact peer-reviewed journal in conjunction with the session. It will be possible to indicate whether presenters are interested in contributing to the special issue during the abstract submission process. More information about the special issue will be available after the abstract submission deadline in September 2021.

 

Session committee:

Charlotte Teresa Weber | Akvaplan-niva, Norway (Co-lead)

Trude Borch | Akvaplan-niva, Norway (Co-lead)

Froukje Maria Platjouw | Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Norway (Co-lead)

Arthur Mason | Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway

Astrid Høgestøl | Norwegian Polar Institute, Norway

Marina Kalinina | UArctic & Northern (Arctic) Federal University (NArFU), Russia

Jon L. Fuglestad | Research Council of Norway

Sibyl Diver | Stanford University, USA

 

 

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Alexey Pavlov Photo: Lars Olav Sparboe

Alexey Pavlov
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