Session V: Resilient Arctic societies

Session format: panel debate

Greater connectivity, industrial and business activities, can enhance investments and improve living standards in northern societies. Representatives of indigenous peoples have long been decisive actors in the international relations of the Arctic, not least as Permanent Participants in the Arctic Council.  Adaptation to the effects of climate change, to the impacts of big industry and foreign investment on local development, and to urbanisation also need to be considered when building resilient Arctic societies.

What is it then that matters most to people in the various parts of the Arctic? What does resilience look like in a rapidly changing Arctic? How can resilience help Arctic communities respond to change? How can innovations in education, culture, economic development and modern technology be used to connect and strengthen the resilience and viability of Arctic communities? What role is there for national governments, the international community, big business, and foreign investors to support local authorities and people to ensure Arctic societies are sustainable and resilient?

Confirmed speakers

  • Anne Karin Olli, State Secretary Ministry of Local Government and Modernisation
  • Pierre Moreau, Minister of Energy and Natural Resources for the National Assembly of Quebec, Canada
  • Bert Stedman, Senator Southeast Alaska, USA
  • Karla Jessen Williamson, Professor, University of Saskatchewan, Canada
  • Christine Batruch, Vice President, Lundin, SWeden
  • Julie Decker, Anchorage Museum Director and CEO, Alaska, USA
  • Grigori Petrovich Ledkov, Russian Association of the Indigenous Peoples of the North (RAIPON)
  • Aleksandra Seljeseth, Youth politician, Labour Party, Tromsø, Norway

Policy Policy

Tuesday 23rd January 2018

11:00 - 12:00

Clarion Hotel The Edge

Add to Calendar 2018-01-23 11:00 2018-01-23 12:00 Europe/Oslo Session V: Resilient Arctic societies Session format: panel debate Greater connectivity, industrial and business activities, can enhance investments and improve living standards in northern societies. Representatives of indigenous peoples have long been decisive actors in the international relations of the Arctic, not least as Permanent Participants in the Arctic Council.  Adaptation to the effects of climate change, to the impacts of big industry and foreign investment on local development, and to urbanisation also need to be considered when building resilient Arctic societies. What is it then that matters most to people in the various parts of the Arctic? What does resilience look like in a rapidly changing Arctic? How can resilience help Arctic communities respond to change? How can innovations in education, culture, economic development and modern technology be used to connect and strengthen the resilience and viability of Arctic communities? What role is there for national governments, the international community, big business, and foreign investors to support local authorities and people to ensure Arctic societies are sustainable and resilient? Confirmed speakers Anne Karin Olli, State Secretary Ministry of Local Government and Modernisation Pierre Moreau, Minister of Energy and Natural Resources for the National Assembly of Quebec, Canada Bert Stedman, Senator Southeast Alaska, USA Karla Jessen Williamson, Professor, University of Saskatchewan, Canada Christine Batruch, Vice President, Lundin, SWeden Julie Decker, Anchorage Museum Director and CEO, Alaska, USA Grigori Petrovich Ledkov, Russian Association of the Indigenous Peoples of the North (RAIPON) Aleksandra Seljeseth, Youth politician, Labour Party, Tromsø, Norway Clarion Hotel The Edge

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