Innovations for a Transformed Arctic: Empowering the Far North for the 21st Century
Organised by the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy

Profound forces are sweeping through the Arctic, ranging from climate change and Indigenous rights to new energy regimes and substantial socio-cultural transitions. While some of the transformations hold considerable promise for regional empowerment, the Arctic Council being an often cited example, global forces such as the rise of China, Arctic warming, and dramatic shifts in commodity prices lie outside the region's ability to control change. In this side-event, participants will examine the convergence of global forces and Arctic developments, seeking to explain how the widely touted "innovations" of the contemporary age might influence the future of the Arctic. The continuing interplay of regional and broader social, cultural, political and economic forces will almost certainly transform life in the Far North, but not perhaps in a manner that matches Arctic priorities. At the centre of this debate are questions about the public policies at the national, regional and international levels and the engagement processes that can maximum the opportunities for Arctic peoples and governments to shape innovations and developments to meet northern aspirations.

Chair: Dr. Ken Coates, Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy.

  • 9:00 Welcome and Introductions
  • 9:10 Emerging Technologies and the Uncertain Benefits for the Far North By Dr. Carin Holroyd, Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan
  • 9:40 The Future of Work and Long-Term Employment Prospects in the Arctic By Dr. Ken Coates, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
  • 10:10 Evolutions in International Relations in the Arctic By Dr. David Welch, Balsillie School of International Affairs:
  • 10:40 The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the Promise of Arctic Equality and Opportunity. By Dr. Jeremy Rayner, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
  • 11: 10 Post-Secondary Innovation and the Promise of Advanced Education in Northern and Indigenous Areas By Mrs. Emmy Stavøstrand Neuls, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, and Dr. Jonathan Crossen, UiT The Arctic University of Norway
  • 11:40 Political Transitions in the European Arctic. By Dr. Aileen Espiritu, UiT The Arctic University of Norway Campus

Additional speakers might be added.

Format: 20 minute presentations and ten minutes of questions

For the latest agenda and for RSVP please contact Emmy Stavøstrand Neuls at emmy.neuls@usask.ca

Organised by Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy

For more information about this event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com

Arena Arena

Wednesday 23rd January 2019

09:00 - 12:00

UiT - TEO-H1 Rom 1.425 (level 4)

Add to Calendar 2019-01-23 09:00 2019-01-23 12:00 Europe/Oslo Innovations for a Transformed Arctic: Empowering the Far North for the 21st Century
Organised by the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy
Profound forces are sweeping through the Arctic, ranging from climate change and Indigenous rights to new energy regimes and substantial socio-cultural transitions. While some of the transformations hold considerable promise for regional empowerment, the Arctic Council being an often cited example, global forces such as the rise of China, Arctic warming, and dramatic shifts in commodity prices lie outside the region's ability to control change. In this side-event, participants will examine the convergence of global forces and Arctic developments, seeking to explain how the widely touted "innovations" of the contemporary age might influence the future of the Arctic. The continuing interplay of regional and broader social, cultural, political and economic forces will almost certainly transform life in the Far North, but not perhaps in a manner that matches Arctic priorities. At the centre of this debate are questions about the public policies at the national, regional and international levels and the engagement processes that can maximum the opportunities for Arctic peoples and governments to shape innovations and developments to meet northern aspirations. Chair: Dr. Ken Coates, Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy. 9:00 Welcome and Introductions 9:10 Emerging Technologies and the Uncertain Benefits for the Far North By Dr. Carin Holroyd, Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan 9:40 The Future of Work and Long-Term Employment Prospects in the Arctic By Dr. Ken Coates, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy 10:10 Evolutions in International Relations in the Arctic By Dr. David Welch, Balsillie School of International Affairs: 10:40 The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the Promise of Arctic Equality and Opportunity. By Dr. Jeremy Rayner, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy 11: 10 Post-Secondary Innovation and the Promise of Advanced Education in Northern and Indigenous Areas By Mrs. Emmy Stavøstrand Neuls, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, and Dr. Jonathan Crossen, UiT The Arctic University of Norway 11:40 Political Transitions in the European Arctic. By Dr. Aileen Espiritu, UiT The Arctic University of Norway Campus Additional speakers might be added. Format: 20 minute presentations and ten minutes of questions For the latest agenda and for RSVP please contact Emmy Stavøstrand Neuls at emmy.neuls@usask.ca Organised by Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy For more information about this event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com UiT - TEO-H1 Rom 1.425 (level 4)

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