Building a coherent observing system - the role of innovation and technology
Organised by Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS) and its member institutions

This workshop will explore the needs and possibilities of new technologies and innovative observing methods in the Arctic. Apart from providing new sets of measurements, such innovation can make research more cost efficient, decrease its environmental impact and help to adapt to future conditions caused by a changing Arctic. It further will highlight the opportunities for the development and testing of new techniques within Earth observation when many disciplines and international institutes cooperate closely to build a common observing system.

The Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS) is an international consortium building a regional multidomain observational system for long term measurements in and around Svalbard. The purpose is to systematically gather and maintain accessible data to address Earth System Science questions related to Global Change. The observing system is based on the extensive capacity and diverse world-class research infrastructure already established in Svalbard. This includes a substantial capability for utilising remote sensing resources to complement ground-based observations. From this solid foundation, SIOS envisions a significant contribution to the development of cost efficient and innovative observation technologies and a consistent observation network design in the Svalbard area. This knowledge can advance other observational networks in the Arctic and elsewhere.

Preliminary programme

14:30 Heikki Lihavainen - Introduction

14:40 Vito VitaleSimple technology to improve capabilities of autonomous observations and/or new sets of measurements

14:50 Ilker FerWater-column observations at high latitudes using ocean gliders

15:00 Rune StorvoldThe new SIOS Research Aircraft at Svalbard, sensors, capacities and opportunities for Arctic Science

15:10 Shridhar JawakRole of emerging technologies in Earth observation and remote sensing to complement the sustained observing system in Svalbard

15:20  Interactive Q and A session using SliDo

16:00 Close

Author biographies

Heikki Lihavainen

Heikki Lihavainen is the director of the Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS). His scientific background is in experimental atmospheric physics. Before SIOS he worked at Finnish Meteorological institute as a research professor and head of Atmospheric composition research unit. He has been involved in several networks and research infrastructures like ACTRIS, ICOS, AMAP, GAW and EMEP. His task at the SIOS Knowledge Centre is to lead the consortium towards full operational capacity, by strengthening the current services provided to the community, leading on efforts to optimise the observing system and making SIOS an effective tool for society.

Vito Vitale

Vito Vitale is senior researcher at the CNR Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (ISAC) in Bologna. He is an expert of radiative transfer processes into the atmosphere, with research focus on radiation budget and role that atmospheric composition and surface characteristics play in modulating Shortwave (SW) and Longwave (LW) radiation components, determining their seasonal and inter-annual variability. He leads the Climate Change Tower Integrated Project (CCT-IP, www.isac.cnr.it/~radiclim/CCTower) a large multidisciplinary project at CNR Arctic Station Dirigibile Italia, aiming to investigate arctic ABL energy budget, and role played by different processes involving air, aerosols, clouds, snow, ice and land (permafrost and vegetation) using well integrated multidisciplinary platforms. During his long activity in polar regions, he has promoted the improvement of observation technology for harsh environments, developing also custom instrumentation. With respect to this topic, at the moment his interest is devoted to increase the capability to perform continuous atmospheric observations over ocean, and snow reflectivity.

Ilker Fer

Fer (Ph.D., 2001, EPF-Lausanne, Switzerland) is professor of physical oceanography at the Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, also affiliated with the Bjerknes Centre of Climate Research. He is the leader of the “Physical Oceanography” research group, and of the “Norwegian National Facility for Ocean Gliders (NorGliders)”. His research interests cover meso to small scale processes in physical oceanography with special attention to high-latitudes, ocean mixing and turbulence, and atmosphere-ocean-ice interaction. He is an observational oceanographer with field experience at sea and on ice, and he led more than 20 expeditions since 2000. Fer has expertise in collecting, processing and analysing data from conventional ship and moored instruments, as well as from various complex platforms including microstructure profilers, gliders, moored profilers, and eddy-covariance systems. He contributed to 90 peer-reviewed articles (lead author on 26). Presently he is leading the research project: “Water mass transformation processes and vortex dynamics in the Lofoten Basin”, and oversees the ocean glider component in SIOS.

Rune Storvold

Rune Storvold is the Chief Scientist at the Drones and Autonomous Systems Research Group in NORCE. He is also Adjunct Associate Professor at the Department of Engineering Cybernetics at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Director for Arctic Center for Unmanned Aircraft. He has background in optics and atmospheric physics from university of Bergen (MS) and University of Alaska Fairbanks (PhD). He started at Norut in 2003 using synthetic aperture radar data for measurements of cryospheric properties and doing modeling of microwave scattering and propagation in snow and ice. In 2005 he established the Unmanned Aircraft Group at Norut which in 2019 was merged into NORCE.

Shridhar Jawak

At the beginning of the winter, Dr. Shridhar Jawak took over a position as a Remote Sensing Officer at the Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS), Longyearbyen, Norway. Before joining SIOS, he was working with the development and operational implementation of remote sensing methods for rapid geo-information extraction in Polar Regions at the National Centre for Polar and Ocean Research (NCPOR), India. His tasks at SIOS Knowledge Centre (SIOS-KC) include to inform and advise on the emerging opportunities that broad range of remote sensing technology offer to Earth System Science researchers, and to bring together geospatial product developers and users to improve the usability of satellite data in Svalbard.

Organised by Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS) and its member institutions

For more information about this side event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com

Arena Arena

Wednesday 23rd January 2019

14:30 - 16:00

Clarion Hotel The Edge - Arbeidskontoret 2

Add to Calendar 2019-01-23 14:30 2019-01-23 16:00 Europe/Oslo Building a coherent observing system - the role of innovation and technology
Organised by Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS) and its member institutions
This workshop will explore the needs and possibilities of new technologies and innovative observing methods in the Arctic. Apart from providing new sets of measurements, such innovation can make research more cost efficient, decrease its environmental impact and help to adapt to future conditions caused by a changing Arctic. It further will highlight the opportunities for the development and testing of new techniques within Earth observation when many disciplines and international institutes cooperate closely to build a common observing system. The Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS) is an international consortium building a regional multidomain observational system for long term measurements in and around Svalbard. The purpose is to systematically gather and maintain accessible data to address Earth System Science questions related to Global Change. The observing system is based on the extensive capacity and diverse world-class research infrastructure already established in Svalbard. This includes a substantial capability for utilising remote sensing resources to complement ground-based observations. From this solid foundation, SIOS envisions a significant contribution to the development of cost efficient and innovative observation technologies and a consistent observation network design in the Svalbard area. This knowledge can advance other observational networks in the Arctic and elsewhere. Preliminary programme 14:30 Heikki Lihavainen - Introduction 14:40 Vito Vitale – Simple technology to improve capabilities of autonomous observations and/or new sets of measurements 14:50 Ilker Fer – Water-column observations at high latitudes using ocean gliders 15:00 Rune Storvold - The new SIOS Research Aircraft at Svalbard, sensors, capacities and opportunities for Arctic Science 15:10 Shridhar Jawak - Role of emerging technologies in Earth observation and remote sensing to complement the sustained observing system in Svalbard 15:20  Interactive Q and A session using SliDo 16:00 Close Author biographies Heikki Lihavainen Heikki Lihavainen is the director of the Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS). His scientific background is in experimental atmospheric physics. Before SIOS he worked at Finnish Meteorological institute as a research professor and head of Atmospheric composition research unit. He has been involved in several networks and research infrastructures like ACTRIS, ICOS, AMAP, GAW and EMEP. His task at the SIOS Knowledge Centre is to lead the consortium towards full operational capacity, by strengthening the current services provided to the community, leading on efforts to optimise the observing system and making SIOS an effective tool for society. Vito Vitale Vito Vitale is senior researcher at the CNR Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (ISAC) in Bologna. He is an expert of radiative transfer processes into the atmosphere, with research focus on radiation budget and role that atmospheric composition and surface characteristics play in modulating Shortwave (SW) and Longwave (LW) radiation components, determining their seasonal and inter-annual variability. He leads the Climate Change Tower Integrated Project (CCT-IP, www.isac.cnr.it/~radiclim/CCTower) a large multidisciplinary project at CNR Arctic Station Dirigibile Italia, aiming to investigate arctic ABL energy budget, and role played by different processes involving air, aerosols, clouds, snow, ice and land (permafrost and vegetation) using well integrated multidisciplinary platforms. During his long activity in polar regions, he has promoted the improvement of observation technology for harsh environments, developing also custom instrumentation. With respect to this topic, at the moment his interest is devoted to increase the capability to perform continuous atmospheric observations over ocean, and snow reflectivity. Ilker Fer Fer (Ph.D., 2001, EPF-Lausanne, Switzerland) is professor of physical oceanography at the Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, also affiliated with the Bjerknes Centre of Climate Research. He is the leader of the “Physical Oceanography” research group, and of the “Norwegian National Facility for Ocean Gliders (NorGliders)”. His research interests cover meso to small scale processes in physical oceanography with special attention to high-latitudes, ocean mixing and turbulence, and atmosphere-ocean-ice interaction. He is an observational oceanographer with field experience at sea and on ice, and he led more than 20 expeditions since 2000. Fer has expertise in collecting, processing and analysing data from conventional ship and moored instruments, as well as from various complex platforms including microstructure profilers, gliders, moored profilers, and eddy-covariance systems. He contributed to 90 peer-reviewed articles (lead author on 26). Presently he is leading the research project: “Water mass transformation processes and vortex dynamics in the Lofoten Basin”, and oversees the ocean glider component in SIOS. Rune Storvold Rune Storvold is the Chief Scientist at the Drones and Autonomous Systems Research Group in NORCE. He is also Adjunct Associate Professor at the Department of Engineering Cybernetics at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Director for Arctic Center for Unmanned Aircraft. He has background in optics and atmospheric physics from university of Bergen (MS) and University of Alaska Fairbanks (PhD). He started at Norut in 2003 using synthetic aperture radar data for measurements of cryospheric properties and doing modeling of microwave scattering and propagation in snow and ice. In 2005 he established the Unmanned Aircraft Group at Norut which in 2019 was merged into NORCE. Shridhar Jawak At the beginning of the winter, Dr. Shridhar Jawak took over a position as a Remote Sensing Officer at the Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS), Longyearbyen, Norway. Before joining SIOS, he was working with the development and operational implementation of remote sensing methods for rapid geo-information extraction in Polar Regions at the National Centre for Polar and Ocean Research (NCPOR), India. His tasks at SIOS Knowledge Centre (SIOS-KC) include to inform and advise on the emerging opportunities that broad range of remote sensing technology offer to Earth System Science researchers, and to bring together geospatial product developers and users to improve the usability of satellite data in Svalbard. �Organised by Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS) and its member institutions For more information about this side event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com Clarion Hotel The Edge - Arbeidskontoret 2

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