Private actors and ocean governance: the Arctic and beyond
Organised by Arctic Frontiers, FNI and NUPI

Oceans cover over 70% of the world’s surface. Many of the important and pressing questions of global environmental health are related to ocean areas beyond national jurisdiction and regulatory regimes. Furthermore, many states lack capacity to enforce national regulations and international agreements/best practices within their own jurisdictions. Stepping in to fill the gaps, from the U.N Global Compact to domestic efforts, the private sector is widely recognized as both an important actor in global governance and a target object of global governance. Arctic environmental governance also means ocean governance.

As global warming is melting the sea ice and allowing commercial exploitation of previously inaccessible areas, the private sector and non-state actors have played increasingly active roles in shaping regional circumpolar governance. The POLGOV research project has focused on researching how and when non-state actors shape environmental regulatory mechanisms and will be presenting the project’s key findings at this side event. The side event will present POLGOV research findings and a sneak preview of the ‘Arctic Environmental Responsibility Index’ (AERI, a ranking Arctic extractive businesses based on input from the members of the International Panel on Arctic Environmental Responsibility).

The side event will also facilitate a broader panel and audience discussion on Arctic and ocean governance. Key questions for the panel include: What does the engagement of the private actors in Arctic governance imply for the broader prospects for ocean governance? What can we learn from past experience in the Arctic? How can the capacity of the private sector and non-state actors be harnessed to address Arctic challenges as well as global problems? And how can private sector capacities be engaged without increasing the democracy deficit that characterizes much of international relations already?

Organised by Arctic Frontiers, FNI and NUPI

For more information about this side event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com

Arena Arena

Wednesday 23rd January 2019

10:30 - 12:00

Clarion Hotel The Edge - Arbeidskontoret 2

Add to Calendar 2019-01-23 10:30 2019-01-23 12:00 Europe/Oslo Private actors and ocean governance: the Arctic and beyond
Organised by Arctic Frontiers, FNI and NUPI
Oceans cover over 70% of the world’s surface. Many of the important and pressing questions of global environmental health are related to ocean areas beyond national jurisdiction and regulatory regimes. Furthermore, many states lack capacity to enforce national regulations and international agreements/best practices within their own jurisdictions. Stepping in to fill the gaps, from the U.N Global Compact to domestic efforts, the private sector is widely recognized as both an important actor in global governance and a target object of global governance. Arctic environmental governance also means ocean governance. As global warming is melting the sea ice and allowing commercial exploitation of previously inaccessible areas, the private sector and non-state actors have played increasingly active roles in shaping regional circumpolar governance. The POLGOV research project has focused on researching how and when non-state actors shape environmental regulatory mechanisms and will be presenting the project’s key findings at this side event. The side event will present POLGOV research findings and a sneak preview of the ‘Arctic Environmental Responsibility Index’ (AERI, a ranking Arctic extractive businesses based on input from the members of the International Panel on Arctic Environmental Responsibility). The side event will also facilitate a broader panel and audience discussion on Arctic and ocean governance. Key questions for the panel include: What does the engagement of the private actors in Arctic governance imply for the broader prospects for ocean governance? What can we learn from past experience in the Arctic? How can the capacity of the private sector and non-state actors be harnessed to address Arctic challenges as well as global problems? And how can private sector capacities be engaged without increasing the democracy deficit that characterizes much of international relations already? � Organised by Arctic Frontiers, FNI and NUPIFor more information about this side event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com Clarion Hotel The Edge - Arbeidskontoret 2

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