The new Arctic - how to meet the future

Arctic sea ice and glaciers are melting and the sea-temperatures increases. The snow cover season is reduced, the permafrost is thawing and rain-on-snow incidents tend to happen more often Changes in the environment cause many species to migrate northwards. At the same time, people of the north move to the cities, the Northern Sea Route opens and the socio-economic opportunities increase. The Arctic is changing at a much faster speed than earlier observed. Model projections indicate that these changes will continue. Future challenges of the Arctic are connected to how the changes in the Arctic will affect social structures, as well as to how well scientists and decision makers will be able to communicate. How do we meet the future of the new Arctic? In which ways can ecosystems and human societies adapt to changes happening in the Arctic? What adaptation solutions must be made on national, regional and local levels? 

In 2017 Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) published the assessments “Snow, Water, Ice and Permafrost in the Arctic (SWIPA)” and the “Adaptation Actions for a Changing Arctic (AACA)”. The SWIPA assessment points to the rapidly changing Arctic and in unexpected ways—into a new state. If current trends are allowed to continue, they will have increasingly profound impacts on human health and safety, industries and economies, and ecosystems around the world. The report received wide attention in media globally. The AACA assessments discuss the drivers of Arctic change how to adapt. AACA looks beyond climate change and concludes that climate change is not always the main driver of Arctic change. The AACA project gives the foundations for decision makers and stakeholders to develop strategies and tools to better deal with climate change and other pertinent environmental stressors. The side event will present main findings from these projects and followed by a keynote session with dialogue between the panelists and the audience.

Part 1: Results from AMAP assessments

  • Rasmus Benestad, Met Norway - Update on climate change in the Arctic and its consequences for the Barents region 
  • Bodil Bluhm, professor, Department of Arctic and Marine Biodiversity, University of Tromsø - Biodiversity in the Arctic Ocean
  • Beaska Niillas, Leader, Norwegian Saami Association - Indigenous peoples perspectives on Arctic change 
  • Monica Tennberg, research professor, University of Lapland - Observing and responding to a changing Arctic

Part 2 - Continued keynote session with questions from moderator and the audience

Final remarks/wrap-up by the moderator

Organised by AMAP

For more information about this side event contact Jon L. Fuglestad, Interim Executive Secretary, Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), jon.fuglestad@amap.no

Arena Arena

Tuesday 23rd January 2018

17:00 - 19:00

Radisson Blu Hotel - Tromsøsal 2

Add to Calendar 2018-01-23 17:00 2018-01-23 19:00 Europe/Oslo The new Arctic - how to meet the future Arctic sea ice and glaciers are melting and the sea-temperatures increases. The snow cover season is reduced, the permafrost is thawing and rain-on-snow incidents tend to happen more often Changes in the environment cause many species to migrate northwards. At the same time, people of the north move to the cities, the Northern Sea Route opens and the socio-economic opportunities increase. The Arctic is changing at a much faster speed than earlier observed. Model projections indicate that these changes will continue. Future challenges of the Arctic are connected to how the changes in the Arctic will affect social structures, as well as to how well scientists and decision makers will be able to communicate. How do we meet the future of the new Arctic? In which ways can ecosystems and human societies adapt to changes happening in the Arctic? What adaptation solutions must be made on national, regional and local levels?  In 2017 Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) published the assessments “Snow, Water, Ice and Permafrost in the Arctic (SWIPA)” and the “Adaptation Actions for a Changing Arctic (AACA)”. The SWIPA assessment points to the rapidly changing Arctic and in unexpected ways—into a new state. If current trends are allowed to continue, they will have increasingly profound impacts on human health and safety, industries and economies, and ecosystems around the world. The report received wide attention in media globally. The AACA assessments discuss the drivers of Arctic change how to adapt. AACA looks beyond climate change and concludes that climate change is not always the main driver of Arctic change. The AACA project gives the foundations for decision makers and stakeholders to develop strategies and tools to better deal with climate change and other pertinent environmental stressors. The side event will present main findings from these projects and followed by a keynote session with dialogue between the panelists and the audience. Part 1: Results from AMAP assessments Rasmus Benestad, Met Norway - Update on climate change in the Arctic and its consequences for the Barents region  Bodil Bluhm, professor, Department of Arctic and Marine Biodiversity, University of Tromsø - Biodiversity in the Arctic Ocean Beaska Niillas, Leader, Norwegian Saami Association - Indigenous peoples perspectives on Arctic change  Monica Tennberg, research professor, University of Lapland - Observing and responding to a changing Arctic Part 2 - Continued keynote session with questions from moderator and the audience Final remarks/wrap-up by the moderator Organised by AMAP For more information about this side event contact Jon L. Fuglestad, Interim Executive Secretary, Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), jon.fuglestad@amap.no Radisson Blu Hotel - Tromsøsal 2

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