Battling Marine Plastics: Sustainable management and best practice

86 MILLION TONS OF PLASTIC HAVE ENDED UP IN THE SEA SINCE 1950.

Annually, more than 8 million tons are added to the equation. Together with onshore activities, lost equipment from fisheries constitutes the main part of plastic pollution to the marine environment. The pollution stretches to areas beyond national jurisdiction. An issue, which is especially pressing for the Arctic.

A growing global population will be increasingly dependent on marine resources for food and medicine. UN Sustainable Development Goals call for urgent action. Business is given a central role and responsibility for health and sustainability of the world's oceans.

Increased compliance expectations and implementation of best practice into company strategies are trending in the international business landscape. A number of initiatives, such as the UN Global Compact Sustainable Ocean Business Action Platform and the High Level Panel for Sustainable Ocean Economy, have been initiated.

How well do these initiatives correlate with existing legal frameworks, such as the UNCLOS and the work of institutions such as the Arctic Council? In what ways can this be part of the solution? How can better ocean regu¬latory management help solve the problem of marine plastic pollution?

17:00 – 18:00 PART 1: THE CHALLENGE

Marine debris contaminates wildlife, seafood and entire marine ecosystems. As micro plastics travel up the food chain, they are threatening food security for the human population, both locally and globally. This is an increasing problem also in the Arctic. Healthy and productive oceans are the foundation for Arctic coastal communities. Plastic pollution is a threat both to Arctic societies dependent on marine resources, and to the health of the world’s oceans. What is the scope of the problem, and what does it tell us about the need for action?

18:00 – 19:00 PART 2: THE SOLUTION

Environmental compliance is on the international business agenda. The trend is driven by several factors. Consumer attitudes, regulations, work of NGOs and companies themselves. UN Sustainable Development Goal 14 and international agreements such as the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea serve as relevant guides for best practice. In what ways can this help solve the issue of plastic pollution in the oceans? How do we go from policy to action?


Organised by the Arctic Frontiers, WWF-Norway and the Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries

For more information about this side event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com

Arena Arena

Tuesday 22nd January 2019

17:00 - 19:00

Clarion Hotel The Edge - Margarinfabrikken 3

Add to Calendar 2019-01-22 17:00 2019-01-22 19:00 Europe/Oslo Battling Marine Plastics: Sustainable management and best practice 86 MILLION TONS OF PLASTIC HAVE ENDED UP IN THE SEA SINCE 1950. Annually, more than 8 million tons are added to the equation. Together with onshore activities, lost equipment from fisheries constitutes the main part of plastic pollution to the marine environment. The pollution stretches to areas beyond national jurisdiction. An issue, which is especially pressing for the Arctic. A growing global population will be increasingly dependent on marine resources for food and medicine. UN Sustainable Development Goals call for urgent action. Business is given a central role and responsibility for health and sustainability of the world's oceans. Increased compliance expectations and implementation of best practice into company strategies are trending in the international business landscape. A number of initiatives, such as the UN Global Compact Sustainable Ocean Business Action Platform and the High Level Panel for Sustainable Ocean Economy, have been initiated. How well do these initiatives correlate with existing legal frameworks, such as the UNCLOS and the work of institutions such as the Arctic Council? In what ways can this be part of the solution? How can better ocean regu¬latory management help solve the problem of marine plastic pollution? 17:00 – 18:00 PART 1: THE CHALLENGE Marine debris contaminates wildlife, seafood and entire marine ecosystems. As micro plastics travel up the food chain, they are threatening food security for the human population, both locally and globally. This is an increasing problem also in the Arctic. Healthy and productive oceans are the foundation for Arctic coastal communities. Plastic pollution is a threat both to Arctic societies dependent on marine resources, and to the health of the world’s oceans. What is the scope of the problem, and what does it tell us about the need for action? 18:00 – 19:00 PART 2: THE SOLUTION Environmental compliance is on the international business agenda. The trend is driven by several factors. Consumer attitudes, regulations, work of NGOs and companies themselves. UN Sustainable Development Goal 14 and international agreements such as the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea serve as relevant guides for best practice. In what ways can this help solve the issue of plastic pollution in the oceans? How do we go from policy to action? Organised by the Arctic Frontiers, WWF-Norway and the Norwegian Directorate of FisheriesFor more information about this side event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com Clarion Hotel The Edge - Margarinfabrikken 3

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