People in the Arctic
Organised by Arctic Frontiers and the Embassy of Canada

It is estimated that between 4 and 6 million indigenous and non-indigenous people live in the Arctic. A community, in the global sense, is not necessarily tied to a physical space. It can be defined as “a feeling of fellowship with others, as a result of sharing common attitudes, interests, and goals”. Arctic communities are very diverse, ranging from the more modern urban to the very remote and sparsely populated, the mix of indigenous and non-indigenous also varies. They can be built on common interests and goals based on certain commonalities; gender, knowledge, art. The diversity creates a wide array of possibilities and challenges of these communities. How do you plan for greater sustainability, accessibility, affordability, and healthier communities in the Arctic? How does indigenous and traditional knowledge balance and integrate the modern? What role does Culture, Creative Industries, Education, and Gender play in creating smart, and flexible communities?

Panelists:

 

  • Moderator: Dr. Jérémie M. McGowan, Director, The Art Museum of Northern Norway

Organised by Arctic Frontiers and the Embassy of Canada

For more information about this side event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com

Arena Arena

Monday 21st January 2019

18:00 - 19:00

Clarion Hotel The Edge - Arbeidskontoret 2

Add to Calendar 2019-01-21 18:00 2019-01-21 19:00 Europe/Oslo People in the Arctic
Organised by Arctic Frontiers and the Embassy of Canada
It is estimated that between 4 and 6 million indigenous and non-indigenous people live in the Arctic. A community, in the global sense, is not necessarily tied to a physical space. It can be defined as “a feeling of fellowship with others, as a result of sharing common attitudes, interests, and goals”. Arctic communities are very diverse, ranging from the more modern urban to the very remote and sparsely populated, the mix of indigenous and non-indigenous also varies. They can be built on common interests and goals based on certain commonalities; gender, knowledge, art. The diversity creates a wide array of possibilities and challenges of these communities. How do you plan for greater sustainability, accessibility, affordability, and healthier communities in the Arctic? How does indigenous and traditional knowledge balance and integrate the modern? What role does Culture, Creative Industries, Education, and Gender play in creating smart, and flexible communities? Panelists: Ms. Aili Keskitalo, President of the Sami Parliament of Norway Ms. Madeleine Redfern, Mayor of Iqaluit, Canada Ms. Alexia Galloway-Alainga, Canadian artist Ms. Ásthildur Sturludóttir, Mayor Akureyri, Iceland Mr. Sergey Kungurtsev, Member of the Barents Committee   Moderator: Dr. Jérémie M. McGowan, Director, The Art Museum of Northern Norway Organised by Arctic Frontiers and the Embassy of Canada For more information about this side event contact Maria Varteressian, Manager, Arctic Frontiers Arena, maria@arcticfrontiers.com Clarion Hotel The Edge - Arbeidskontoret 2

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