2 Feb 2021 – Science parallel 2 – 1330-1430 GMT+1

Session 5: The coupled Arctic system: Improved understanding from recent international campaigns

 

Block of short presentations

(Full abstracts and presentations will be accessible on the conference platform)

 

New insights into radiative transfer in sea ice derived from autonomous ice internal measurements

Katlein, Christian (1; presenting author); Valcic, Lovro (2); Lambert-Girard, Simon (3); Anhaus, Philipp (1); Nicolaus, Marcel (1); Hoppmann, Mario (1)

(1) Alfred-Wegener-Institut, (2) Bruncin Observation Systems, (3) Takuvik Joint International Laboratory, Université Laval and CNRS (France)

Research highlights:

  • Non-destructive autonomous measurement of vertical in-ice irradiance profiles
  • Characterizing light attenuation within sea-ice in relation to its physical properties
  • Describing seasonal changes in biomass distribution based on spectral light measurements

 

Snow-Related Variability of Spectral Solar Radiation Transmitted Through Arctic First-Year-Ice in the Lincoln Sea

Anhaus, Philipp (1; presenting author); Katlein, Christian (1); Nicolaus, Marcel (1); Arndt, Stefanie (1); Jutila, Arttu (1); Haas, Christian (1)

(1) Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

Research highlights:

  • Optical approaches reveal the potential to predict snow depths
  • Transmitted light measured with a remotely operated vehicle underneath Arctic sea ice

 

Albedo observations using drone at Svalbard and Arctic Ocean

Ivanov, Boris (1; presenting author)

(1) Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute

Research highlights:

  • This study reveals that arctic hummocks and marginal zones of Svalbard glaciers have a different albedo and  surface  temperature  in compare  with flat  surfaces (sea ice, glacier plato)

 

Surface-Based Ku- and Ka-band Polarimetric Radar for Sea Ice Studies

Stroeve, Julienne (1; presenting author); Willatt, Rosemary (1); Nandan, Vishnu (2)

(1) University College London, (2) University of Manitoba

Research highlights:

  • Snow depth from radar altimetry

 

Changes in spectral transmittance through Arctic first year sea ice during melt pond development on MOSAiC leg 4

Matero, Ilkka (1; presenting author); Lange, Benjamin (2); Smith, Madison (3); Macfarlane, Amy (4); Katlein, Christian (5); Anhaus, Philipp (5); Nicolaus, Marcel (5)

(1) Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung, (2) Norwegian Polar Institute, (3) University of Washington, (4) WSL Institute for Snow and Avalance Research (SLF), (5) The Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Research highlights:

  • This study presents a high resolution dataset for spatial variability of light transmittance through melting first year sea ice

 

The trouble maker – time series of sea ice deformation during MOSAiC

von Albedyll, Luisa (1; presenting author); Hutchings, Jennifer (2); Haas, Christian (1,3); Hoppmann, Mario (1); Hwang, Byongjun (4); Itkin, Polona (5); Lei, Ruibo (6); Watkins, Daniel (2); Haapala, Jari (7)

(1) Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, (2) College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, (3) University of Bremen, (4) University of Huddersfield, (5) UiT Arctic University of Norway, (6) MNR Key Laboratory for Polar Science, Polar Research Institute of China, (7) Finnish Meteorological Institute

Research highlights:

  • We derived deformation from SAR satellite imagery and an array of GPS drifting buoys along the drift track of the MOSAiC floe.
  • The deformation on the 5 km scale close to the MOSAiC floe was representative for the deformation in the wider (50 km) region.
  • A full reconstruction of the deformation history of the ice will be useful for up-scaling of physical, biological and chemical processes.

 

Under-Ice Light Field in the Western Arctic Ocean during Late Summer

Veyssière, Gaëlle (1; presenting author); Castellani, Giulia (2); Wilkinson, Jeremy (1); Karcher, Michael (2,3); Hayward, Alexander (4,5); Stroeve, Julienne (6,7,8); Nicolaus, Marcel (2); Kim, Joo-Hong (9); Yang, Eun-Jin (9); Valcic, Lovro (10); Kauker, Frank (2,3); Khan, Alia (11)

(1) British Antarctic Survey, (2) Alfred Wegener Institute, (3) O.A.Sys-Ocean Atmosphere Systems GmbH, (4) National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, (5) The University of Otago, (6) University College London, (7) University of Manitoba, (8) National Snow and Ice Data Center, (9) Korea Polar Research Institute, (10) Bruncin, (11) Western Washington University

Research highlights:

  • New and recent under-ice light dataset in the Chukchi Sea during late summer
  • Existence of two types of FYI in late summer with distinct physical and optical properties

 

Freeze effects on trace gas circulation between sea ice and the winter mixed layer

Damm, Ellen (1; presenting author); Abrahmasson, Katarina (2); Delille, Bruno (3); Stefels, Jacqueline (4); Zhan, Liyang (5); Nomura, Daiki (6); Simoes Pereira, Patric (2); Rabe, Benjamin (7); Morholz, Volker (8); Bauch, Dorothea (9); Haas, Christian (10)

(1) Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung, (2) Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, (3) Unit, Université de Liège, (4) University Groningen, (5) Third Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources, Xiamen, (6) Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, (7) Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven, Germany, (8) Leibniz-Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, (9) Leibniz Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Stable Isotope Research, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany and GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, (10) Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven, Germany

Research highlights:

  • This study strong interactions between growing sea ice and the winter mixed layer (WML) and multiple feedbacks for gas circulation in this interface

 

Evolution of physical properties of sea ice for multiple ice types at the MOSAiC central floe and the DN

Angelopoulos, Michael (1; presenting author); Damm, Ellen (2); Simões Pereira, Patrick (3); Abrahamsson, Katarina (3); Bauch, Dorothea (4,5); Dumitrascu, Adela (3); Krumpen, Thomas (2); Marsay, Chris (6); Nomura, Daiki (7); Bowman, Jeff (8); Rinke, Annette (2); Stefels, Jacqueline (9); Sachs, Torsten (10); Stevens, Mark (11); Verdugo, Josefa (2,12); Wang, Lei (13); Zhan, Liyang (14)

(1) Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research, (2) Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany, (3) Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, (4) Leibniz Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Stable Isotope Research, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany, (5) GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany, (6) Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, University of Georgia, Georgia, United States, (7) Field Science Center for Northern Biosphere, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan, (8) Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States, (9) University of Groningen, GELIFES, Groningen, Netherlands, (10) GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Section Remote Sensing and Geoinformatics, Potsdam, Germany, (11) Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, Florida, United States, (12) University of Bremen, Faculty 2 Biology/Chemistry, Bremen, Germany, (13) State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China, (14) Third Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources, Xiamen, China

Research highlights:

  • Sediment observations in the sea ice suggest that the initial biogeochemical conditions of the residual ice for the distributed network are related to coastal waters

 

Deformation of the MOSAiC ice floe during early freeze-up phase

Park, Jeong-Won (1; presenting author); Kim, Hyun-Cheol (1)

(1) Korea Polar Research Institute

Research highlights:

  • This study analyzes the ice deformations from dense time-series of satellite observations during early freeze-up phase.
  • The retrieved deformation fields well agree with them from buoy network but provides much finer spatial information.
  • The use of deformation history can improve accuracy in SAR-based ice type classification.

 

Bio-physical characterization of Arctic sea ice habitats using an Underwater Hyperspectral Imager: a comparison between sea ice ridges and level first-year ice during MOSAiC

Lange, Benjamin (1; presenting author); Matero, Ilkka (2); Salganik, Evgenii (3); Campbell, Karley (4); Consortium, HAVOC/PHOTA (5); Granskog, Mats (6)

(1) Norwegian Polar Institute, (2) Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, (3) Norwegian University of Science and Technology, (4) UiT The Arctic University of Norway, (5) HAVOC/PHOTA consortium institutes, (6) Norwegian Polar Insitute

Research highlights:

  • First use of a underwater hyperspectral imager mounted on an ROV and for surveying sea ice ridges

 

Structure and drivers of ocean mixing north of Svalbard in summer and fall 2018

Koenig, Zoe (1,2; presenting author); Kolås, Eivind (3); Fer, Ilker (3)

(1) Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen and Bjerknes Center for Climate Research, Bergen, Norw, (2) Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, (3) Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen and Bjerknes Center for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway

Research highlights:

  • Estimates of vertical turbulent heat flux from the Atlantic Water layer up to the mixed layer  is on average 8 W m−2 , accounting for ∼1% of the total heat loss of the Atlantic layer north of Svalbard
  • Summer melting of sea ice reduces the temperature, salinity and depth of the mixed layer, and increases salt and buoyancy fluxes at the base of the mixed layer
  • Deeper in the water column and near the seabed, tidal work is a main source of turbulence

 

Nordic Cooling, Atlantic Inflow, and Arctic Sea Ice cover over the last century

Smedsrud, Lars Henrik (1,2; presenting author); et al.

(1) University of Bergen and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, (2) University Centre on Svalbard

Research highlights:

  • This study documents increased cooling of Atlantic Water in the Arctic Seas over the last century
  • This increased cooling is consistent with an increasing Atlantic Inflow and a decrease in the sea ice cover in the Polar and Barents Seas
  • The variability in cooling is mostly occuring in the Nordic Seas and drives a major uptake of CO2, and can be explained by atmospheric circulation changes.

 

Drift and sea-ice thickening of the MOSAIC floe reflected in stable isotopes of the water

Bauch, Dorothea (1; presenting author); Damm, Ellen (2); Meyer, Hanno (3); Fang, Ying-Chih (4); Kuznetsov, Ivan (4); Rabe, Benjamin (4); Abrahamsson, Katarina (5); Angelopoulos, Michael (3); Bowman, Jeff (6); Dimitrescu, Adela (5); Nomura, Daiki (7); Rinke, Annette (3); Sachs, Torsten (8); Schaffer, Janin (4); Simões Pereira, Patric (5); Stefels, Jacqueline (9); Verdugo, Josefa (4,10); Wang, Lei (11); Zhan, Liyang (12)

(1) Leibniz Laboratory for Radiometric Dating and Stable Isotope Research, Kiel University, (2) Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, (3) Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, (4) Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, (5) Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, (6) Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, (7) Field Science Center for Northern Biosphere, Hokkaido University, (8) GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Section Remote Sensing and Geoinformatics, (9) University of Groningen, GELIFES, (10) University of Bremen, (11) State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, (12) Third Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources

Research highlights:

  • Large vertical gradients and temporal changes are found in stable isotopes (delta18O and deltaD) of the water during the drift of the MOSAIC floe from late autumn 2019 to early spring 2020

 

Warm Atlantic Water explains observed sea ice melt rates north of Svalbard

Duarte, Pedro (1; presenting author); Sundfjord, Arild (1); Meyer, Amelie (2); Hudson, Stephen (1); Spreen, Gunnar (3); Smedsrud, Lars (4)

(1) Norwegian Polar Institute, (2) ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, IMAS University of Tasmania, (3) University of Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics, (4) Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research

Research highlights:

  • Most of the sea ice entering the area known as Whalers Bay, in the NW of Svalbard, melts in less than a month, keeping it almost ice-free
  • Melting rates larger than 1.5 m month-1 result from a combination of the presence of warm Atlantic Water and storm enhanced mixing
  • In the absence of storms, estimated high sea ice melting rates require ocean surface temperature above 5oC

 

The Seasonal Evolution of the Northern Barents Sea 2018-2019

Lundesgaard, Øyvind (1; presenting author); Sundfjord, Arild (1); Renner, Angelika H.H. (2)

(1) Norwegian Polar Institute, (2) Institute of Marine Research

Research highlights:

  • We present novel time-series ocean observations from the northern Barents Sea, including below persistent sea ice cover.
  • This study shows the seasonal evolution of ocean currents, vertical stratification, and water properties in the context of large-scale sea ice and atmospheric forcing.
  • Ocean temperature variability appears closely tied to the advection of water masses influenced by Atlantic Water from the boundary current north of Svalbard.

 

Interannual variability in late summer hydrography and nutrient concentrations north of Svalbard linked to sea ice extent

Renner, Angelika (1; presenting author); Bailey, Allison (2); Reigstad, Marit (3); Sundfjord, Arild (2); Øygarden, Sigrid (3)

(1) Institute of Marine Research, (2) Norwegian Polar Institute, (3) UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Research highlights:

  • Late summer nutrient concentrations in the Atlantic Water inflow region north of Svalbard vary greatly interannually.
  • The sea ice cover plays a major role for the hydrography and nutrient and chlorophyll distribution in the region.

 

Contact
Alexey Pavlov Photo: Lars Olav Sparboe

Alexey Pavlov
email

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