2 Feb 2021 – Science parallel 1 – 1330-1430 GMT+1

Session 1: Arctic health and social inequalities in health

 

Block of short presentations

(Full abstracts and presentations will be accessible on the conference platform)

 

Human Health in the Arctic: preliminary finds from the 2021 AMAP Assessment

Khoury, Cheryl (1; presenting author); Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie (2,3); Kruemmel, Eva (4); Weihe, Pál (5,6); Dudarev, Alexey A. (7); Wenneberg, Maria (8); Adlard, Bryan (1); Rautio, Arja (9,10); Abass, Khaled (10,11); Olafsdottir, Kristin (12); Berner, James E (13)

(1) Health Canada, (2) Aarhus University, (3) Greenland University, (4) Inuit Circumpolar Council, (5) Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, The Faroese Hospital System, (6) Affiliated Professor in Public Health, Faculty of Science and Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, (7) Department of Arctic Environmental Health, Northwest Public Health Research Center, (8) Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health Umeå University, (9) University of the Arctic Vice-president Research, (10) University of Oulu, (11) University of Helsinki, (12) University of Iceland, (13) Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Retired

Research highlights:

  • The diets of Arctic peoples are changing, causing both positive and negative consequences.
  • Levels of persistent organic pollutants remain higher in some parts of the Arctic compared to the rest of the world.
  • Risk communication needs to be well balanced, and should take into account cultural aspects and benefits of traditional country foods.

 

Socio-demographic, behavioural and psycho-social factors associated with depression in two Russian cities

Cook, Sarah (1,2; presenting author); Saburova, Lyudmila (3); Bobrova, Natalia (2); Avdeeva, Ekaterina (4); Malyutina, Sofia (4,5); Kudryavtsev, Alexander V (1,6); Leon, David A (2,1,7)

(1) Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, (2) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, (3) Institute of Philosophy and Law, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, (4) Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch of Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, (5) Novosibirsk State Medical University, (6) Northern State Medical University, (7) International Laboratory for Population and Health, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Research highlights:

  • Associated factors were socio-demographic (sex, financial constraints, employment), behavioural (abstaining, problem drinking, smoking) and psycho-social (not enough people to confide in, life events)
  • There were particularly large effect sizes and a dose-response for financial constraints, problem drinking and life events
  • Not being in regular paid employment was more strongly related to depressive symptoms in men than women

 

Self-reported alcohol consumption and hazardous drinking in Russian and Norwegian men and women: The Know Your Heart study and the Tromsø Study – a part of the Heart to Heart collaboration comparing population health in Russia and Norway

Hopstock, Laila (1; presenting author); Kudryavtsev, Alexander (2); Malyutina, Sofia (3); Cook, Sarah (4)

(1) UiT The Arctic University of Norway, (2) Northern State Medical University, (3) Novosibirsk State Medical University, (4) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Research highlights:

  • Both the two extreme points, total abstaining from alcohol as well as hazardous drinking, were more often reported among Russian men than Norwegian men.
  • Russian men reported drinking more per occasion while Norwegian men reported drinking more frequently, i.e. binge drinking seem be more common in Russia than Norway.
  • Norwegian women reported a more hazardous drinking pattern than Russian women, for both heavy drinking and problem drinking.

 

Higher diabetes prevalence in Russia compared to Norway: role of obesity and other risk factors varies by sex

Iakunchykova, Olena (1; presenting author); Averina, Maria (1,2); Malyutina, Sofia (3,4); Wilsgaard, Tom (1); Kudryavtsev, Alexander (5,1); Cook, Sarah (6,1); Wild, Sarah (7); Eggen, Anne Elise (1); Hopstock, Laila (1); Leon, David (8)

(1) Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, (2) Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, (3) Research Institute of Internal and Preventive Medicine, Branch of Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, (4) Novosibirsk State Medical University, Russian Ministry of Health, (5) Department of Innovative Programs, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, (6) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, (7) Usher Institute, The University of Edinburgh, (8) Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Research highlights:

  • Russia has lower life expectancy than Western countries and also has far higher cardiovascular disease rates and diabetes prevalence.
  • Prevalence of diabetes is appreciably higher in Russia compared to Norway based on two large population-based studies – the Tromsø study (Norway, 2015-2016) and Know Your Heart (Russia, 2015-2018).
  • Adiposity contributes substantially to the higher prevalence of diabetes among women in Russia compared to Norway.

 

The educational gradient in intake of energy, macro- and micronutrients in the Tromsø Study 2015-2016

Nilsen, Linn (1; presenting author); Lundblad, Marie Wasmuth (1); Hopstock, Laila Arnesdatter (1); Skeie, Guri (1)

(1) UiT The Arctic University of Norway – Department of Community Medicine

Research highlights:

  • An educational gradient was found for diet in the Tromsø 7 Study
  • Participants with long tertiary education had higher odds of being compliant with seven out oh eighteen nutrient recommendations used in this study.
  • A negative educational gradient was found for carbohydrates, added sugar and iodine, and a positive educational gradient was found for fiber, alcohol, vitamin C, folate and iron

 

Neighbourhood Health Behavior Effects on Body-Mass Index: Evidence from The Tromsø Study

Sari, Emre (1; presenting author); Moilanen, Mikko (2); Njølstad, Inger (3); Grimsgaard, Sameline (3)

(1) UiT The Arctic University of Norway – School of Business & Economics, (2) UiT The Arctic University of Norway –  The School of Business & Economics, (3) UiT The Arctic University of Norway – Department of Community Medicine

Research highlights:

  • There is a significant association between the neighborhood’s mean physical exercise habit and its residents’ BMI.
  • In Tromsø, people living in a neighborhood with low socioeconomic conditions are likely to have a higher BMI.
  • Mean BMI of people living in Tromsø has been steadily increasing since 1979-80.

 

Prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in different age groups of the population of Arkhangelsk, Northwestern Russia

Kostrova, Galina (1; presenting author); Malyavskaya, Svetlana (2); Lebedev, Andrey (2)

(1) NOTHERN STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY, (2) Northern State Medical University

Research highlights:

  • This study reveals high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among all age groups of the Arkhangelsk population
  • It is necessary a population-based intervention to reduce vitamin D deficiency as well as to reduce the burden of vitamin D deficiency-related diseases in the Arctic region

 

Do old sins have long shadows? Time-variant POP exposure during 30 years and changes in body weight, blood lipids and T2DM risk

Rylander, Charlotta (1; presenting author); Charles, Dolley (1); Haugdahl Nøst, Therese (1); Sandanger, Torkjel Manning (1); Bergdahl, Ingvar (2); Ayotte, Pierre (3); Brox, Jan (4); Averina, Maria (5); Wilsgaard, Tom (1); Huber, Sandra (5); Berg, Vivian (6)

(1) Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic university of Norway, (2) Umeå University, (3) Université Laval, (4) the University Hospital North Norway, (5) the University Hospital in North Norway, (6) Department of Medical Biology, UiT the Arctic University of Norway

Research highlights:

  • This is the first longitudinal study of POPs and T2DM with more than two repeated measurements from the same individual.
  • Compared to healthy control individuals, T2DM cases experience higher concentrations of POPs already 15 years prior to diagnosis.
  • T2DM cases and healthy controls have different longitudinal changes in POP concentrations.

 

Heavy metal contamination of reindeer meat and offal originating from the Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Northwestern Russia

Unguryanu, Tatiana (1; presenting author); Lyzhina, Alena (2); Mitrokhin, Oleg (3); Polibin, Roman (3)

(1) Northern State Medical University, (2) Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M.V. Lomonosov, (3) Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University)

Research highlights:

  • The highest mean concentrations of cadmium and mercury were detected in reindeer liver and kidney compared to muscle.
  • The mean concentrations of cadmium and mercury in reindeer liver and kidney exceed the maximum permissible levels in Russia for bovine animals.
  • The mean concentrations of lead and arsenic in reindeer meat and offal were lower than the maximum permissible levels in Russia for bovine animals.

 

Pre- and post-diagnostic blood profiles of perfluoroalkyl acids in type 2 diabetes mellitus cases and controls

Charles, Dolley (1; presenting author)

(1) UiT, Norges Arktiske Universitet

Research highlights:

  • Repeated measures of PFAAs were used to study their association to T2DM.
  • PFAAs exposure did not increase the odds of T2DM.
  • T2DM status did not influence the temporal changes in PFAAs concentrations.

 

The Environmental Pollutant Laboratory  – State of the Art Research on Human Health Effects Related to Contaminants

Huber, Sandra (1; presenting author); Averina, Maria (2,3); Brox, Jan (1)

(1) University Hospital of North Norway, (2) University Hospital of North Norway – UNN, (3) The Arctic University of Norway – UiT

Research highlights:

  • The Environmental Pollutant Laboratory provides an unique tools for screening and biomonitoring, but also for studying health effects of exposure to environmental pollutants in humans.

 

Disseminating Public Health Knowledge through novel science communication  Novel Science communication – how to build public health knowledge across the social  gradient. The Healthy Choices Project (WP5).

Wien, Charlotte (1; presenting author); Rosenbaum, Sarah (2); Røislien, Jo (3); Hetland, Audun (4); Wærås, Torgunn (5); Gjengedal, Julie (6); Brøndbo, Stig (6); Schøning, Bente (5); Sandanger, Torkjel (6)

(1) UiT, (2) Norwegian Institute of Public Health, (3) UiS, (4) UiT Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, (5) UiT the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, (6) UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Research highlights:

  • Can novel science dissemination reduce social inequalities in public health?
  • We are establishing a framework for how to identify key public messages and how to successfully reach your target groups

 

Healthy Choices and the Social Gradient – addressing social inequalities in health

Njølstad, Inger (1; presenting author); et al.

(1) UiT the Arctic University of Norway

Healthy Choices and the Social Gradient is a five-year research project at the Department of Community Medicine, UiT the Arctic University of Norway, enabled through a 50 mill NOK grant from the Research Council of Norway for 2019-2024 and equivalent funding from the UiT. The project is an “umbrella” for research on social inequalities in health, involving several UiT research groups and centers, six national and international partners, and several national and international collaborating institutions and scientists.

The backbone of Healthy Choices and the Social Gradient research is large population studies – the nationwide Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC) (N=170,000) and studies from the Northern region: the Tromsø Study (N=45,000), SAMINOR (N= 16,000) and the Finnmark Study (N= 25,000), all of which conducted several surveys that included questionnaires, biological specimens and physiological measurements. Together, those studies cover a 45 year long time span and allow life course studies on physical and mental health and diseases, including epigenetics. Also, new surveys among university students and children are being planned under the Healthy Choices umbrella.  Importantly, survey data may be linked to nationwide registries on health and various diseases and causes of death.

Healthy Choices is organized into six work packages:

WP 1: Project administration

WP 2: Research data management and availability: To provide easy access to research data, including on-line analysis of data

WP 3: From conception to next generation and into old age: To provide new insights on the complex interrelationship between traditional SES markers, modifiable risk factors and hard endpoint, and identify vulnerable groups for selected intervention

WP 4: Biostatistical methods and models: To explore available data to characterize the social exposome, including molecular and socioeconomic factors to evaluate their contributions to age trajectories

WP 5: Novel science communication for healthy choices: To develop and implement new ways of communicating public health messages to the public and decision makers

WP 6: Education and transition phases, student knowledge and training: To build a research program with and for students, and to integrate education and research in student active learning

During Arctic Frontiers 2021, you may get acquainted with Healthy Choices projects presented through abstract sessions.

Want to learn more? Please visit uit.no/research/choices.

Research highlights:

  • New insights in health trajectories and healthy aging
  • Improved knowledge about students’ and youngsters’ health and welfare
  • Novel science communication regarding public health issues
Contact
Alexey Pavlov Photo: Lars Olav Sparboe

Alexey Pavlov
email
+47 948 45 342

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