Russia in the Arctic: international and regional dimensions

Photo: View of Murmansk Commercial Seaport and railway station. Pavel Parmenov/123rf

In the Arctic, Russia meets other Arctic states with a number of key national interests that are most easily realized through international cooperation and regional stability. On the other hand, all of the other Arctic coastal states belong to NATO – a security alliance seen as a threat in Russian security thinking – and are currently committed to a partial sanctions regime against Russia due to the annexation of Crimea in 2014 and continued conflict in eastern Ukraine.

All Arctic states have also stated their intention to buffer Arctic cooperation to the extent possible from geopolitical challenges in other compass directions. Russia continues to cooperate in a regional setting with several of these states, not least Norway through a large number of Barents projects.

Does the tense political atmosphere matter for how Russia formulates or pursues its Arctic aims? Given the geopolitical crises and Russian involvement elsewhere in the world (Syria, for example), does Russia have the capacity to invest heavily in Arctic politics at all? Could the Arctic become a deprioritized political ‘backyard’ – with some central issues kept in check but more comprehensive and important problems or opportunities in multilateral relations left unexplored? Or is it possible that Arctic cooperation, like in the Barents or the Arctic Council, can incubate improved relations in other geographical settings? This roundtable explores these questions at two levels – the broader geopolitical/international and the comprehensive regional Barents Euro-Arctic cooperation.

Sessions Format: 6-minute introductions followed by Q&A and debate

16:45 Introductory remarks

  • Marit Berger Røsland, State Secretary, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

16:50 Session I: International dimension

Speakers (in order of short interventions before debate)

  • Bobo Lo, Associate Research Fellow, Russia-NIS Center, French Institute of International Relations (IFRI)
  • Nikita Lomagin, Vice-Rector for GR at the European University in St.Petersburg
  • Elana Wilson Rowe, Senior Research Fellow at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs
  • Robert Orttung, Director of Research, Sustainability Collaborative and Associate Research Professor, George Washington University

17:15 Q&A followed by panel discussion

17:40 Session 2: Regional dimension: cooperation across borders

Speakers (in order of short interventions before debate)

  • Cecilie Myrseth, Chair of Troms County Government
  • Tomas Hallberg, Head of the International Barents Secretariat
  • Gleb Yarovoy, Former Associate Professor and Vice-Dean at the Petrozavodsk State University
  • Arild Moe, Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow at the Fridtjof Nansen Institute

18:05 Q&A Followed by panel discussion

18:30 Wrap-up by the moderator

              

Arena Arena

Monday 23rd January 2017

16:45 - 18:30

UIT - Auditorium 2

2017-01-23 16:45 2017-01-23 18:30 Europe/Oslo Russia in the Arctic: international and regional dimensions Photo: View of Murmansk Commercial Seaport and railway station. Pavel Parmenov/123rf In the Arctic, Russia meets other Arctic states with a number of key national interests that are most easily realized through international cooperation and regional stability. On the other hand, all of the other Arctic coastal states belong to NATO – a security alliance seen as a threat in Russian security thinking – and are currently committed to a partial sanctions regime against Russia due to the annexation of Crimea in 2014 and continued conflict in eastern Ukraine. All Arctic states have also stated their intention to buffer Arctic cooperation to the extent possible from geopolitical challenges in other compass directions. Russia continues to cooperate in a regional setting with several of these states, not least Norway through a large number of Barents projects. Does the tense political atmosphere matter for how Russia formulates or pursues its Arctic aims? Given the geopolitical crises and Russian involvement elsewhere in the world (Syria, for example), does Russia have the capacity to invest heavily in Arctic politics at all? Could the Arctic become a deprioritized political ‘backyard’ – with some central issues kept in check but more comprehensive and important problems or opportunities in multilateral relations left unexplored? Or is it possible that Arctic cooperation, like in the Barents or the Arctic Council, can incubate improved relations in other geographical settings? This roundtable explores these questions at two levels – the broader geopolitical/international and the comprehensive regional Barents Euro-Arctic cooperation. Sessions Format: 6-minute introductions followed by Q&A and debate 16:45 Introductory remarks Marit Berger Røsland, State Secretary, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs 16:50 Session I: International dimension Speakers (in order of short interventions before debate) Bobo Lo, Associate Research Fellow, Russia-NIS Center, French Institute of International Relations (IFRI) Nikita Lomagin, Vice-Rector for GR at the European University in St.Petersburg Elana Wilson Rowe, Senior Research Fellow at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs Robert Orttung, Director of Research, Sustainability Collaborative and Associate Research Professor, George Washington University 17:15 Q&A followed by panel discussion 17:40 Session 2: Regional dimension: cooperation across borders Speakers (in order of short interventions before debate) Cecilie Myrseth, Chair of Troms County Government Tomas Hallberg, Head of the International Barents Secretariat Gleb Yarovoy, Former Associate Professor and Vice-Dean at the Petrozavodsk State University Arild Moe, Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow at the Fridtjof Nansen Institute 18:05 Q&A Followed by panel discussion 18:30 Wrap-up by the moderator                UIT - Auditorium 2 Arctic Frontiers

This page uses cookies, read more about it here »

Gnist